The Present Position of Sexual Intercourse 

The Present Position of Sexual Intercourse

  • Today sexual intercourse is disrespected and no longer secretly treated.
  • There is casual sex relations done by any one, any where at anytime without any meaning attached.
  • Sex before marriage is rampant and an aspect of courtship among couples. Curiosity is also a driver to these sex affairs.
  • Unfaithfulness among married couples is rampant for wives and husbands alike, done out of varying reasons with negative consequences.
  • Sex is a commodity sod in hotel and streets; one can have sexual intercourse with any woman as long as you can pay.
  • Sex education that prepared the youth for marriage is declining and parents have left the job to schools and other forces.
  • Several sexual deviations are on the rise, e.g. rape, lesbianism, homosexuality, defilement, anal sex, oral sex, quite funny and very negative.
  • There exist protection and defense for some sexual deviations such as lesbianism and homosexuality by some human rights activists.
  • Small and sometimes no punishments are effected on some sexual offenders of lesbianism and homosexuality.
  • Sexual intercourse is becoming a public game well exposed on the internet and videos.
  • There is rise of group sex where one man can share sexual relations with two or more women at a time.
  • Some parents are impatient to let the children first sleep, go a head and have sex when children are hearing.
  • Sexual satisfaction for women is suffering gaps with women theft, starving and demanding by their husband.
  • Married partners have become so busy with business and work, that sexual intercourse is give limited time.
  • Women have gadgets they use to have sex, the artificial sex, due to the lack of satisfaction from their husbands.
  • a\Shared sex relations for hospitality and women sharing are dying out due to diseases like HIV/AIDS and women emancipation.
The African Family Institution 
  • Most families in African tradition were extended in nature i.e they were made up of the father,mother,biological children, close and distant relatives.
  • The discipline of the children in the family was for everyone but not only the biological parents.
  • Children grew up caring about other people feelings, i.e. they considered the likes and dislikes of other people in the society and family.
  • The father was the head of the family and he had a lot of authority and he was the decision maker.
  • Culture was highly emphasized in the family i.e. children grew up knowing and practicing their cultural norms and practices.
  • Traditional families loved and so much valued children and that is why families had a lot of children.
  • In traditional families, the male children were more loved and valued than the female children because they were the heirs.
  • The property of the family was in the hands of the husband/ father and the male children.
  • Family work was done according to sex, for example, girls cooked food, cleaned the utensils etc while boys hunted, reared animals etc.
  • Morals were highly emphasized among the children and the children highly respected their parents.
  • The family was a religious institution that emphasized and imparted religious values into the children.
  • The family also acted as an educational institution that imparted informal education into the young children including sex education.
  • The wealthier and bigger the family was in traditional Africa, the more respect the father received.
  • In traditional African families, the father was superior while the mother was inferior.
  • In traditional families, parents usually chose marriage partners for their children and this partly led to stable families.

1. Explain the African set up of the family institution. (13 marks) Approach: 

The question wants the major features/characteristics of the African traditional family set up.

Importance of Extended Family Pattern
  • It was the traditional African family lifestyle highly valued for:
  • The family helped in creating unity in the society especially where different families were related to one another.
  • It promoted harmonious living especially among the children, who grew up together and thus well knowing each other.
  • It promoted cooperation among family members as opposed to the individualism of the nuclear family.
  • It broke aspects of superiority complex in the family as all members could freely accept their social economic situation.
  • Children in the family grew up with the desire and willingness to know and be with their relatives.
  • Extended families broke the challenge of children knowing their mother tongue as emphasized in the family.
  • They had labour force for production and any other purpose and as a result, labour was not a problem in extended families.
  • Such families promoted strict discipline of children because of the upbringing of the children in a collective responsibility.
  • It helped in the transmission of culture to the children in society. This was done by grandparents who were always present at home.
  • The elderly, sick could easily be taken care of by the family members. They could be given food, medical care and other needs.
  • There was the aspect of love promoted among members of a family, the desire and acceptance of one another.
  • Extended families had free will and ability to assist each other without any one depressed about it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *